Difference between ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET WebForms?

ASP.NET Web Forms uses Page controller pattern approach for rendering layout, whereas ASP.NET MVC uses Front controller approach. In case of Page controller approach, every page has its own controller, i.e., code-behind file that processes the request. On the other hand, in ASP.NET MVC, a common controller for all pages processes the requests. ASP.NET WebForms ASP.NET MVC Uses the ‘Page Controller’ pattern. Each page has a code-behind class that acts as a controller and is responsible for rendering the layout. Uses the ‘Front Controller’ pattern. There is a single central controller for all pages to process web application requests and … Click here to continue…..

What is ASP.NET MVC?

ASP.NET MVC is a web development framework from Microsoft that is based on MVC (Model-View-Controller) architectural design pattern. Microsoft has streamlined the development of MVC based applications using ASP.NET MVC framework. MVC (Model-View-Controller) is an architectural software pattern that basically decouples various components of a web application. By using MVC pattern, we can develop applications that are more flexible to changes without affecting the other components of our application. “Model” is basically domain data. “View” is user interface to render domain data. “Controller” translates user actions into appropriate operations performed on model.

SSD Vs HDD Comparison

Now it’s time to do some comparisons and determine which might be best for your individual needs – SSD or HDD? The best way to compare items is a table with a side by side comparison of items in which a green text indicates an advantage: Attribute SSD (Solid State Drive) HDD (Hard Disk Drive) Power Draw / Battery Life Less power draw, averages 2 – 3 watts, resulting in 30+ minute battery boost More power draw, averages 6 – 7 watts and therefore uses more battery Cost Expensive, $1.00 per gigabyte (based on buying a 240GB drive) Only around … Click here to continue…..

What is HDD

Hard Disk Drives, or HDD in techno-parlance, have been around for donkey’s years relative to the technology world. HDDs were first introduced by IBM in 1956 – yes folks this is nearly 60-year old technology, thank goodness vacuum tubes for TVs didn’t last so long! HDD uses magnetism to store data on a rotating platter. A read/write head floats above the spinning platter reading and writing data. The faster the platter spins, the faster HDD can perform. Typical laptop drives today spin at either 5400 RPM (Revolutions per Minute) or 7200RPM, though some server-based platters spin at up to 15,000 … Click here to continue…..